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Thread: Dog Integration and Wee-Wee Pad Training. Baby Shih-Tzu

  1. #1

    Default Dog Integration and Wee-Wee Pad Training. Baby Shih-Tzu

    So excited to find this forum! Hello, my wife Danielle and I have a 4 and a half year old Shih-Tzu named Delilah. She is a wonderful dog and is actually a certified therapy dog. Delilah is extremely friendly and sweet and she is regarded by anyone who has met her as a wonderful dog to know.

    I will say this – Delilah is very spoiled. We have let her sleep in our bed from a very early age and we generally pamper her in terms of playing with her, giving her treats and making her happy. She has over 50 toys and lots of clothes. She does attend doggie day care and is around people very often.

    DOG INTEGRATION: On August 5th this week we brought home Bella, a 9 week old (born May 27) Shih-Tzu. We are just getting to know Bella but so far she is a sweetheart. Unfortunately, Delilah was not happy with Bella. Bella would be playful towards Delilah and try to sniff her and play with her. Delilah would get defensive and run away or else she would bark aggressively at Bella. Bella is never scared of this and instead tries to play even more and Delilah is clearly not happy. Delilah has a very strong personality and it is obvious when she is upset. Delilah is very angry this ‘intruder’ is in her space.

    We partially bought Bella because we want Delilah to have another dog in the house and not be alone when we are both at work or when we are out of the house. We live in a home with lots of room for both dogs to play. Because this is so important to us, we badly want to do what it takes to get them both to get along as soon as possible. Any suggestions?

    TRAINING BELLA: Delilah's attitude is also making training Bella more difficult. Our plan is to wee-wee pad train Bella (as is Delilah). We have an Octogon shaped pen in our kitchen (about 3 feet by 3 feet) with a bed, food-water, and a pad. During the day from 7am-10pm Bella will be placed here when we are not playing with her. This 'pen' is on the main floor near Delilah's food and drink as well which I'm guessing bothers Delilah. At night, Bella sleeps in a cage on the lower level of the house. The cage is big enough for her bed and is about 2 by 2 feet. Getting Bella to 'pee on her pad' as soon as possible is our goal. And more importantly, to get Delilah to accept her and love her. Is it okay to keep a pad in the cage overnight from 11pm-6am when I wake? Each of the 1st two nights Bella has peed a couple of times overnight and pooped as well. We feed her at about 6:30pm and put her to bed at 10:30pm. Can you please advise on the best course of action in terms of where the pads should be etc? Again, right now we keep a pad in both locations. We've read that a puppy of her age might pee as often as every 2 hours and can't be expected to 'hold it in' for 7-8 hours. THANK YOU!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Sunny California
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    1,672

    Default

    Already gave a partial answer for this one on your post in the Introduce Yourself section, so will respond here with some thoughts on the additional details in this post.

    For overnight training, you can certainly use a pad if you're going to have her in her pen, but if you'll be crating her overnight, she definitely shouldn't have a pad in there unless you have a crate large enough to have one side as a sleeping area and one side as a potty area. Is your eventual goal for her to go potty outside or do you intend to have her permanently pad trained? That may influence what the best plan would be for overnight training as well as possibly what you're doing with her during the day.

    If you decide that you want to avoid having her have pads in her crate overnight, you can learn more about overnight training and scheduling in our Surviving the Night with your New Puppy article.

    If you'd like to give me more details about your training goals, I'd be happy to help with any additional questions!
    Rebecca
    Please help us to continue to provide this free source of housebreaking information by bookmarking our products page
    and buying your pet supplies through our product partners!

  3. #3

    Default Pad Training

    Thanks again! THe Crate is a comfortable 3 feet by 2 feet. I have the pad on one side and a blanket on the other side along with a safe chew toy and other toy. I hear your point on not using the pad in the Crate and I guess we should try that. We plan to permanently indoor train her. She will be 9-12 pounds and out other Shih-Tzu is house trained. The older dog has 3 'bathrooms' meaning pad placed in strategic locations in the house. We do walk the older dog as well and she goes to the bathroom outside as well but we only walk her once a day due to our work schedules. Is this Crate big enough for the puppy or would you still suggest to remove the pad? Interestingly enough - she usually holds her pee! She poops in the crate but doesn't pee until the morning. I should also add - we go to bed at 11pm and I wake up at 6am. One of us always checks on Bella (the puppy) half way through the night - we take her out to her pad to pee.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Sunny California
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    1,672

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    If you're still finding that Bella poops in her crate in spite of the fact you're giving her a trip to her pad in the middle of the night, you might do best to continue to give her access to the pad in her crate. Without knowing her size, it's hard to say if that crate size is right for doing pad training, but just keep in mind she should have an area of the crate where she can comfortably sleep without touching the potty pad.

    Are her poops solid? It's a little odd that she's pooping in the crate but holding her pee, so I'm wondering if she might have loose stools that are hard to control? Or the opposite issue could be the problem... if she tends to have a bit of constipation, her overnight potty trips might not give her sufficient time to empty her bowels, as some dogs need to move around a bit to get things going. If anything seems off about her poops, you might want to talk to the vet so you can resolve any issues that might be contributing to her housebreaking problems.

    Hope things are improving!!
    Rebecca
    Please help us to continue to provide this free source of housebreaking information by bookmarking our products page
    and buying your pet supplies through our product partners!

  5. #5

    Default Improving

    Things are improving for sure. We actually have a great space off of our den that is 5 feet long by 3 feet wide. It is an exit-way to our backyard we never use. We have her pad at the far end and lots of cumfy blankets and a bed along with safe toys in the area. We have a gate blocking the exit. She has had 100% success since we put her here Aug 17th. Always poops on the pad. When out of this area when we play with her she knows to pee on the pad. Her success rate is 80-90% of the time out of the 'bedroom' which we are happy with.

    NEW issues - she is an escape artist like I've never seen. At 3.2 pounds she can climb any gate. So - we bought an expensive, special dog gate that only has vertical panels that she can't climb and it weights 30 pounds so she can't move it. However, she bites the wall near the exit of the fence when she gets frustrated. We are using Bitter Apple now and we'll see how that works. Anything better? I also just ordered on-line Corner Guard wall protectors designed to prevent the dog biting from Amazon.
    (link: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 )

    I have a new question about our older dog's sensitive stomach I'll post in a separate post.

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